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marc41

Marc Brumlik Chicago, United States of America

newrez-v

Nautilus Scripts Apr 21 2013
Score 52%
52 Likes
48 Dislikes

Cold Fish

Wallpaper Other Nov 04 2008
Score 52%
52 Likes
48 Dislikes
Audio/Video/Image/Text/ISO Convert

Nautilus Scripts 379 comments

Score 78%
78 Likes
22 Dislikes
Jan 05 2017
It works fine and you did NOT download the fixed version I posted? That would be weird!

Does it still seem to be slow? - Jan 06 2017
I see it!! The Fedora/Ubuntu "translate" program outputs only the translated text. The Arch version has the "-verbose" option set by default, which tells it to display each original line, followed by the translation in bold print (using escape sequences).

THAT'S THE PROBLEM!!

The solution should be to add the "-b" option (for "brief").

I have done that and re-posted. - Jan 05 2017
When you answered the initial setup questions, did you set the language to something other than English? - Jan 04 2017
My guess is that we're still dealing with the translate-shell program and that it must behave differently than the "translate" in Fedora and Ubuntu.

Did you set the language to something other than English? If you did, then try this and send me the results:

echo -e "This is a test of\ntranslate-shell" | sed 's/$/++/' | trans - Jan 04 2017
OK -- Updated version is in place...
Let me know what happens!! - Dec 31 2016
I don't think I stated my question clearly enough...

What I'm wanting is some text from either "info trans" or from "man trans" that the script can use to guarantee that the /usr/bin/trans it finds is indeed the "translate-shell" package.

For example, on my system (Fedora, which installs /usr/bin/translate): "info translate" and "man translate" both display text that includes the phrase "translate a text or web page".

On your system, do you get something similar?

I just need to know what phrase to look for, and whether to use "info" or "man", so I can add that second test properly for Arch. - Dec 30 2016
OK. It looks good.

My script tests two things, trying to be sure that the package is installed. First, it looks for the binary (in Arch, /usr/bin/trans). That part should have worked fine.

Then the script does a second test. In Fedora and Ubuntu and others, the command "info translate" (or "info translate-bin") returns a text page that includes the string "translate a text or web page".

I'm checking for that, just in case I found a program named "translate" that isn't actually the package that's needed.

So please on your system type "info trans" to see what you get. If nothing, then I'll remove the test for 'translate-shell'. Or if you DO get something, please message me with a short piece of the text you see that could be used as this test (something that's probably unique). - Dec 29 2016
I have just uploaded the change. The new version is 0.999
Does this now work for you?? - Dec 29 2016
Hello!!

I do not have an Arch Linux set up here, but I have done some research. I am sure that the package you need is "translate-shell" https://aur.archlinux.org/packages/translate-shell/

I will adjust the script to add this as satisfying the requirement and re-post with a new version number.

I am sure this will fix it for you. Let me know after you have tested it.

-- Marc - Dec 29 2016
To both your suggestions...

Regarding an integrity check, I may include this in the actual script, though it does take as long to run as to play the audio or video file. But for now, here is the command to run:
ffmpeg -v error -i filename.ext -f null -

Regarding tags, it appears that these can be specified directly in the command line. This means that it would be simple for you to add them using the "key in options" function that is already in my script. Further, this function in the script allows you to permanently add them to your menus simply by providing a comment when you key them in. Message me if you need more instruction than that.

This web page shows the options and how to specify them:
http://jonhall.info/how_to/create_id3_tags_using_ffmpeg

Has this been helpful?

-- Marc - Apr 07 2014
Anything to help a comrade leave M$ :-) - Apr 06 2014
Just saw your message -- sometimes gnome-look fails to email them to me.

I'm not familiar with this and will have to look into it. If you'd like to elaborate on this suggestion please email me directly tsi-inc@comcast.net - Apr 06 2014
I do not have a Mint system to test this on. I will install one in VirtualBox and figure this out.

You will definitely need "libtranslate" or equivalent, but while researching your comment I realize that "curl" and "links" are no longer necessary (they were required for my OLD way of translating, using web services like babel and google-translate, but the NEW way with libtranslate does not need them).

I will report back with what you need, and I will revise the script so it no longer checks for curl or links.

More news soon... - Mar 21 2013
Oh thanks! Sorry for the delay, gnome-look did not forward your comment to me.

I personally use Fedora and apparently haven't done enough Ubuntu testing. I'll get that fixed!!! - Mar 21 2013
Turned out to be a dependency issue - Aug 05 2012
Your first point is correct - in the rewrite of translation (which USED TO rely on Google or Babel), I ended up checking for libtranslate before asking if you wanted translation. In the old code, I used Google to get a list of languages first, and if you chose English I then didn't require installing curl and elinks (required for Google/Babel). With the Google service no longer available, I couldn't get a language list without first having libtranslate installed. This could be changed by first asking if translation is desired at all. Good point!

Also, the elinks and curl requirements should actually be removed (not needed for the libtranslate method). I'll deal with this for the next release. Thanks for bringing it to my attention. If you would prefer not to install these packages, I'd suggest going to the case statement "case $trbin in" and adding a new line below the first case to read: *) translate=/bin/true ;;
That should quiet it down...

The second issue you mention isn't happening on my system. I tried it with "imageext=same", where jpg defaults to jpg and gif defaults to gif, and with "imageext=jpg", where both jpg and gif default to jpg. In both cases, jpg is present in the list and can be checked or unchecked manually.

With "imageext=same", when I select both a jog and a gif, it seems to like defaulting to gif (but jpg IS in the list). When "imageext=jpg", selecting those two files defaults to jpg.

Am I understanding correctly that on your system "jpg" is not even in the list of choices? The list should always include: gif jpg ico pdf png tif OTHER. Do you have all except for jpg?

In the current version of the script, the list of options is defined on line 198. In the lines that follow, your setting for "imageext" is then compared to this list to potentially set the appropriate type as checkboxed on by default. I've tried setting imageext=xxxxx and it simply doesn't pre-check a box. Same if "imageext" is misspelled.

So I'm not sure what's happening here... Try removing .config/avconvert/avconvert and let the script recreate it, though based on the code I really don't see what's wrong!

You could also try selecting OTHER and type "jpg" just to see what happens. Or play with the list in line 198 and see what the results are (add another "jpg" to the list?)

This is a bit baffling...

Let me know what you find!!! - Mar 25 2012
Did you try the Nautilus-Actions settings I PM'd to you? What distro are you using? - Feb 23 2012
newrez - Increase Screen Rez For Netbook

Nautilus Scripts 146 comments

Score 71%
71 Likes
29 Dislikes
Dec 20 2013
I am not sure what your question is. I will try to help...

1 - I can see that you used "chmod" properly. This is good.

2 - You do NOT need to use "sh newrez". After chmod is done, you can run "./newrez" directly.

3 - You do NOT need to use "sudo". On some systems this will not work at all.

4 - You do NOT need "bash newrez". Like #2, the chmod was proper. Also, this script wants sh.

I believe your problem may be this: If a script or other program is not found in your $PATH, then when you type its name to run it you will get a "not found" error.

This may be why you are trying "sudo", "sh", and "bash". When run that way, the system will look in the current directory.

$PATH is a list of folders that will be searched when you type a command. To see where your system looks, type the command: "echo $PATH"

This will usually include "/usr/local/bin" and "$HOME/bin" and these are the two best places you could put any new program.

If you put a program in /usr/local/bin then it will be available to all users (this will need "sudo mv ...").
If you put a program inj $HOME/bin the it will only be available to you (this just needs "mv ...").

After moving newrez to one of these places (you do NOT need to move it to both places), you will be able to run it with "newrez HHHxVVV" directly.

I hope this has helped.

-- Marc - Oct 30 2014
Glad that it now auto-runs for you.

If there are any instructions you'd like to pass along, I can include them in the description. - Feb 06 2014
Are you saying that autostart will let you name a program but not arguments? If so, then just put "newrez HHHxYYY" into a text file, make it executable, and then reference that file in auto start. - Feb 06 2014
What Linux distro are you using?
If there is no auto start, perhaps add it to bashrc or even perhaps as part of boot with a time delay..

Newrez actually is a script, so there ought to be a place to launch it.

On my netbook I got not auto start it. I have three icons, default, 1120, and 1280 and I switch often to whichever is best for the current task. - Feb 05 2014
I'd forgotten about this for a while...

My netbook does not seem to have the same issue of blurriness after returning to default resolution. Whether I choose "default" or "1024x600" the result looks the same as when I first log in.

However, I did find something you could try after returning to default rez. The command: xrandr --auto

This will turn the VGA port back off. Not sure if it will make a difference, but perhaps.

As for blurry display when in scaled mode (higher than hardware resolution), this is unavoidable. This is because each pixel displayed is less than one physical pixel on the screen.

Let me know if the --auto helps.

-- Marc - Nov 11 2013
That's interesting, and when my netbook is back up I will investigate. You're right, it might be that 'xrandr scale' introduces the issue when at 100%. - Oct 14 2013
Sorry for the SUPER-delayed response -- just haven't checked in a while...

My netbook is 1024x600 native. I generally switch back and forth between this and 1280x800. At the moment the netbook is sick (drive problems) but I can say from memory that I don't recall any issues when switching back to 1024.

Are you saying it is blurry on your display both for "default" and when you explicitly set it to the default resolution? Or do you get different results between the two?

After setting yourself back to default using each of the two methods, look at the output of the "xrandr" command. See if there is any difference between the two for the current setting.

Glad you like the script!

-- Marc - Oct 14 2013
Here is my own personal setup...

(This is on an eeepc running Fedora 18 and the Cinnamon desktop):

I've got two icons on the top launcher, one runs "newrez 1280x800" and the other runs "newrez 1024x600". Newrez is in /usr/bin so no PATH is needed. This lets me switch back and forth at any time.

--Marc - Aug 06 2013
Here is my own personal setup...

(This is on an eeepc running Fedora 18 and the Cinnamon desktop):

I've got two icons on the top launcher, one runs "newrez 1280x800" and the other runs "newrez 1024x600". Newrez is in /usr/bin so no PATH is needed. This lets me switch back and forth at any time.

--Marc - Aug 06 2013
Interesting, because an "original resolution" issue (being trapped in the original screen size) was the issue that this release of newrez was to fix.

The command "lspci | grep VGA" will show what video card you have, though since you're unsure I doubt that a vendor-supplied driver (like those for ATI and nVidia) is the cause.

I have not tested on the latest Ubuntu, so I'll try that from this end. Had this worked for you before? Your reference to newrez-v implied you've been a user for a while. Did this breakage occur after an upgrade?

-- Marc - Apr 22 2013
What portion of the screen causes this to happen? Does it work properly until you move the mouse to that area?

I have posted newrez-v separately. I hope I found the right version -- it's been unused for a while now.

Also -- what distro and version are you using and what video card and driver?

-- Marc - Apr 21 2013
Simple problem, two possible solutions.

The cause: though you have downloaded the newrez file, it not in your "search path". Therefore the shell can't find it. This would be true of ANY script you install or write.

Solution 1: execute it using the full path to the command where it is located, as in "~/.gnome2/nautilus-scripts/newrez 1280x800"

Solution 2: make a copy (or a link) of the newrez script into /usr/local/bin (which would require sudo and would make it available to all users) or into ~/bin (which does not require sudo and will make available to just you).

Have fun! - Mar 13 2013
Simple problem, two possible solutions.

The cause: though you have downloaded the newrez file, it not in your "search path". Therefore the shell can't find it. This would be true of ANY script you install or write.

Solution 1: execute it using the full path to the command where it is located, as in "~/.gnome2/nautilus-scripts/newrez 1280x800"

Solution 2: make a copy (or a link) of the newrez script into /usr/local/bin (which would require sudo and would make it available to all users) or into ~/bin (which does not require sudo and will make available to just you).

Have fun! - Mar 13 2013
Simple problem, two possible solutions.

The cause: though you have downloaded the newrez file, it not in your "search path". Therefore the shell can't find it. This would be true of ANY script you install or write.

Solution 1: execute it using the full path to the command where it is located, as in "~/.gnome2/nautilus-scripts/newrez 1280x800"

Solution 2: make a copy (or a link) of the newrez script into /usr/local/bin (which would require sudo and would make it available to all users) or into ~/bin (which does not require sudo and will make available to just you).

Have fun! - Mar 13 2013
I am glad this is working for you!!

The bug reports and patch for xrandr are because they added a new "feature" to prevent the mouse pointer from moving beyond the edge of the screen. This was so the pointer would never travel past the edge and be difficult to find.

This feature did not account for scaled screens, therefore it was also a "bug". The problem was that on a scaled screen, the mouse was constrained to the hardware resolution.

The "fix" was to add the new (higher) resolution to the VGA port, then set VGA as the primary display, and finally to set the LCD as a scaled mirror.

TO USE THIS NEW VERSION IN A SCRIPT:
In your script (or from a command line in terminal), you can execute a command like "newrez 1280x800" or "newrez default".

If this does not work for you, please send me another message. Tell me what version of Linux you are running.

-- Marc - Mar 11 2013
I am glad this is working for you!!

The bug reports and patch for xrandr are because they added a new "feature" to prevent the mouse pointer from moving beyond the edge of the screen. This was so the pointer would never travel past the edge and be difficult to find.

This feature did not account for scaled screens, therefore it was also a "bug". The problem was that on a scaled screen, the mouse was constrained to the hardware resolution.

The "fix" was to add the new (higher) resolution to the VGA port, then set VGA as the primary display, and finally to set the LCD as a scaled mirror.

TO USE THIS NEW VERSION IN A SCRIPT:
In your script (or from a command line in terminal), you can execute a command like "newrez 1280x800" or "newrez default".

If this does not work for you, please send me another message. Tell me what version of Linux you are running.

-- Marc - Mar 11 2013
NOTE THAT ANY COMMENTS BEFORE THIS ONE RELATE TO OLDER VERSIONS OF THIS SCRIPT! - Jan 07 2013
WOW -- Very good -- now I have something to track down. I will dig into this. THANKS!!! - May 01 2012
This is a known issue, not with the script, but with the latest 'xrandr' package. This package can do many things in managing screens, scaling is one of them. Apparently to fix a different situation, it was changed "to keep the pointer in-bounds". But for the type of scaling my script is doing, it's now broken.

That its why I wrote the second script newrez-z which your download also provided. It's a little less elegant and and a little slower, but guaranteed to work. Hopefully the xrandr developers will get the problem fixed soon!

Let me know how the other script works for you. - Apr 29 2012
This is a known issue, not with the script, but with the latest 'xrandr' package. This package can do many things in managing screens, scaling is one of them. Apparently to fix a different situation, it was changed "to keep the pointer in-bounds". But for the type of scaling my script is doing, it's now broken.

That its why I wrote the second script newrez-z which your download also provided. It's a little less elegant and and a little slower, but guaranteed to work. Hopefully the xrandr developers will get the problem fixed soon!

Let me know how the other script works for you. - Apr 29 2012
This is a known issue, not with the script, but with the latest 'xrandr' package. This package can do many things in managing screens, scaling is one of them. Apparently to fix a different situation, it was changed "to keep the pointer in-bounds". But for the type of scaling my script is doing, it's now broken.

That its why I wrote the second script newrez-z which your download also provided. It's a little less elegant and and a little slower, but guaranteed to work. Hopefully the xrandr developers will get the problem fixed soon!

Let me know how the other script works for you. - Apr 29 2012
Just made some additional changes, to ensure that Ubuntu-related specifics all take effect and that they do NOT interfere on OTHER distros.

Be sure you get newrez 0.4! - Feb 29 2012
The newrez script is behaving as I'd expected. Apparently the current release of "xrandr" was supposed to have fixed a bug where the mouse could leave the viewing area. This introduced the new bug you see where it cannot leave the boundaries of the original resolution.

So, that's why I did newrez-v

The problem you're having there is probably very simple. The first time it is run, there is a lot of setup to be done (especially in Ubuntu), and it needs to ask the sudo password a number of times along the way. Therefore, the first time, it needs to be run in a terminal session. After that you can use it as a nautilus script.

LET ME KNOW!!

-- Marc - Feb 29 2012
OOPS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I had created the upload from a folder that had a link to the script instead of where the script actually lives. I've just re-uploaded the proper files.

Remember that in Unity or Gnome3, the Linux program "xrandr" does not seem to work properly. You will probably need to use "newrez-v". I hope the Gnome folks get this fixed soon!

newrez uses xrandr to create a scaled screen directly in X. newrez-v sets up a VNC server in a higher resolution, then attaches a viewer in scaled mode. Not as slick or as fast, but it does work.

Let me know how this works for you.

-- Marc - Feb 29 2012
OOPS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I had created the upload from a folder that had a link to the script instead of where the script actually lives. I've just re-uploaded the proper files.

Remember that in Unity or Gnome3, the Linux program "xrandr" does not seem to work properly. You will probably need to use "newrez-v". I home the Gnome folks get this fixed soon!

newrez uses xrandr to create a scaled screen directly in X. newrez-v sets up a VNC server in a higher resolution, then attaches a viewer in scaled mode. Not as slick or as fast, but it does work.

Let me know how this works for you.

-- Marc - Feb 29 2012
I installed Ubuntu into a virtual machine so I could debug this all the way through. MANY exceptions were needed. Give version 0.3 a try and let me know what happens! - Feb 21 2012
Newrez-v is now updated to version 0.2

It properly handles the different package name for the VNC Server in Ubuntu - Feb 20 2012
On my system, I use Fedora. In Fedora, the program "vncserver" is provided by the package "tigervnc-server".

I just looked up Ubuntu. I believe the package you need is "vnc4server". Also, it seems to provide the program "vnc4server".

I may need to adjust my script to test which Linux distro is being used.

On your system, install the package "vnc4server" and then see if you have a program of the same name. Let me know what you find. I will adjust the script.

-- Marc - Feb 19 2012
newrez-v must be run from the command line the first time you use it. That is because it needs to ask you for a password during the VNC setup.

Here are the steps...
First, start the program "Terminal" from the menus
Then, depending on where you saved the script, cd to that directory. For example: cd /home/frostwire/Desktop
Then execute the script with: ./newrez-v

After you have set it up the first time, you can then run it with a simple double-click. - Jan 31 2012
Watcher -- Zenity Progress Window

Nautilus Scripts 8 comments

Score 65%
65 Likes
35 Dislikes
Sep 04 2010
I will assume your script controls the names of your download files. For example, $HOME/Downloads/abcxyz*

If you can be sure the names are unique and all start the same way as above, here is the change you need, and if it works for you I will post an update.

In my script, find the line containing
du -a -b "$1"
Change it to:
du -a -b -c "$1"*

Then, on the same line, add a new step before the awk. Change the part reading:
null | awk
to
null | tail -1 | awk

These two changes will cause the "du" to get the total for all files beginning with "$1", and to feed only the total to the awk.

Let me know how this works!

-- Marc
- Jan 15 2014
I will assume your script controls the names of your download files. For example, $HOME/Downloads/abcxyz*

If you can be sure the names are unique and all start the same way as above, here is the change you need, and if it works for you I will post an update.

In my script, find the line containing
du -a -b "$1"
Change it to:
du -a -b -c "$1"*

Then, on the same line, add a new step before the awk. Change the part reading:
null | awk
to
null | tail -1 | awk

These two changes will cause the "du" to get the total for all files beginning with "$1", and to feed only the total to the awk.

Let me know how this works!

-- Marc
- Jan 15 2014
I will assume your script controls the names of your download files. For example, $HOME/Downloads/abcxyz*

If you can be sure the names are unique and all start the same way as above, here is the change you need, and if it works for you I will post an update.

In my script, find the line containing
du -a -b "$1"
Change it to:
du -a -b -c "$1"*

Then, on the same line, add a new step before the awk. Change the part reading:
null | awk
to
null | tail -1 | awk

These two changes will cause the "du" to get the total for all files beginning with "$1", and to feed only the total to the awk.

Let me know how this works!

-- Marc
- Jan 15 2014
Interesting...

I am guessing you mean that a you are separately downloading multiple files which will later be combined to a single file?

If you know the expected final size of the result, and if you know the names of the multiple partial-files, you could monitor the aggregate size of the partial-files using something like:
du -a -c file1 file2 file3 | tail -1
or if the files are similarly names, then:
du -a -c partname* | tail -1

The other possibility might be to start multiple watcher scripts, one for each partial file. In that case, you'd have to guess for example that if there are 3 threads then the expected size for each is 1/3 of the expected total size.

Does this help?

-- Marc - Jan 15 2014